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Homework Help For Grade 2

We know that most families have a full schedule, and it can be hard to find time for that extra focus we want to have on math. With DreamBox it’s easy to find ways to work a little math fun into everyday family activities and keep it from becoming a chore.

DreamBox supports parents in their commitment to their child’s math education, suggesting math games and fun everyday activities to explore with young children.

At this age, kids are using numbers and quantitative methods in more advanced ways. They now have a repertoire of basic addition and subtraction combinations that they can use as tools in computing. They understand subtraction as the inverse of addition. Because they can better understand space and quantity, a broader range of mathematical ideas become more accessible. And a major developmental shift occurs when beginning multiplication.

Find ways to practice number operations

  • Practice counting down from any double-digit number. For example, use a calendar to count down the number of days to an upcoming event.
  • Prepare for multiplication by helping your child think in groups. Ask “how many fingers do five people have?”
  • Try a variation on the card game “War.” When the higher card takes the lower card, subtract the lower number from the higher number, and the player who won that play wins those points.
  • Give your child the change in your pocket and ask how many different ways she can make 25 cents.
  • Play a variation on the game “Go Fish.” Instead of asking for cards with numbers that match, players take turns asking for cards that, added to the card she has, adds up to 10. Count face cards as zero, aces as 1’s.

Find ways to develop reasoning skills

  • If your child knows that 4 quarters is 1 dollar, can he figure out what 6 quarters is?
  • Ask your child to estimate the height of a tree by estimating how much higher it might be than an 8′ fence next to it.

Find ways to collect and organize information

  • Read sports score tables, weather charts, and other common numerical information you find in the news.
  • As you’re shopping, compare the amounts in the Nutrition Facts on packaged foods or the amounts in various containers of similar products.
  • Take measurements for a project around the house. How many inches are there? How many feet? How many yards?

Some family games that help develop math skills:

  • At this age kids are developing more complex ways of reasoning — they like strategic thinking games like checkers, chess, Monopoly, and Clue.
  • Dominoes
  • Mancala
  • Cribbage

Try some 2nd grade-level DreamBox math games

Read more math learning parent tips for:

When you subscribe to DreamBox, you’ll get regular academic progress emails that include tips for family activities that reinforce the specific lessons your child is learning.

Wondering how to help your children with homework — or how to get them to do it without a struggle? Here’s how.

What’s the point of homework? “Homework is designed to help students reinforce key concepts, process and solidify new information, provide time for extra practice of skills, and reflect on how much they’ve learned,” notes teacher Susan Becker, M. Ed. However, approaches to homework vary from district to district, school to school and teacher to teacher. Some schools don’t give children homework until the 2nd grade, others start in kindergarten. Some teachers create original homework, while other use or modify prepared work sheets.

Don’t do the homework for your child. Most teachers use homework to find out what the child knows. They do not want parents doing their children’s homework but do want parents to make sure homework is completed and review any mistakes to see what can be learned from them.

Don’t take over your child’s projects. Teachers do not want parents doing their kids’ projects. Instead, they want parents to support their kids’ learning and make sure they have what they need to accomplish a task. Check with your child’s teacher for his policy and review it with your child.
Set up a good space to work. All children need the same thing: a clean, well-lit space. But keep in mind that each child may work differently; some will do their work at the kitchen table and others at their desks in their rooms.

Pay attention to your child’s rhythms and help him find the right time to begin his work. Some children will work best by doing homework right after school; others need a longer break and must run around before tackling the work. Most will need a snack. If your child does after-school activities, set a homework time before or after the activity, or after dinner. Whatever routine you choose, help your child stick to it.

Find out how your child studies best. “You should find the ways your child likes to study. For example, some kids will learn spelling words by writing them out, others by closing their eyes and picturing them and saying them aloud,” advises teacher Susan Becker, M. Ed. “The sound environment is also important,” adds Michael Thompson, Ph.D. “Some kids may want to listen to music, some are helped by being in the middle of noise, others need absolute quiet.”

Don’t hover — but stay close by. Keep in mind that it’s their homework, not yours, but remain available in case you are needed. “The ideal set up would be for a parent to be reading nearby while the child is studying because then you both are doing your educational work together, but that’s not always possible,” says Michael Thompson, Ph.D. “A parent may be working out of the home, or need to be working in the home and cooking dinner. So if you are home, stay close, and if you are not there, have another adult check to make sure it’s going OK. And remember that all homework is not equal, so not everything will need your rapt attention.”

Limit media exposure. Turn off the TV and the iPod when your child does homework. And the computer too, unless it’s being used for research. You might start by asking how much time he thinks he should spend on this, and negotiate from there. Remember, you have the final word. And keep in mind that if you watch TV when your child can’t, the plan may backfire.

Let the teacher know if you gave your child a lot of homework help. “If your child needs extra help or truly doesn’t understand something, let the teacher know. Write on the assignment, ‘done with parental help,’ or write a separate note,” advises Michael Thompson, Ph.D. If your child resists, explain that homework is used to practice what you know and to show the teacher what you need help learning more about — so it’s a parent’s job to let the teacher know.

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