1 Kiktilar

His/120 Complete Assignments

General Information | The Program | Requirements | Courses |

Courses in History (HIS)

Lower Division

1. Introduction to History (2)

Lecture—1 hour; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to history, its key methodologies, writing tasks, and research practices. Examination of the development of history as an academic discipline; ethics in historical research. Topical focus changes regularly. GE credit: SS, WC, WE.

3. Cities: A Survey of World Cultures (4)

Lecture—3 hours; lecture/discussion—1 hour. Survey of urban world cultures, focusing on up to ten cities selected by the instructor. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

4A. History of Western Civilization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Growth of western civilization from late antiquity to the Renaissance. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

4B. History of Western Civilization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. History of western civilization from the Renaissance to the Eighteenth Century. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE.

4C. History of Western Civilization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Development of Western Civilization from the Eighteenth Century to the present. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

6. Introduction to the Middle East (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Survey of the major social, economic, political and cultural transformations in the Middle East from the rise of Islam (c. 600 A.D.) to the present, emphasizing themes in religion and culture, politics and society. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

7A. History of Latin America to 1700 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to the history of Spanish and Portuguese America from the late pre-Columbian period through the initial phase and consolidation of a colonial regime (circa 1700). Topics include conquest, colonialism, racial mixture, gender, and labor systems. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—F. (F.) 

7B. History of Latin America, 1700-1900 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Latin America from colony to republic. The nature of Iberian colonialism, the causes for independence, the creation of nation states, the difficulties in consolidating these nations, and the rise of Liberalism and export economics in the nineteenth century. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—W. (W.) 

7C. History of Latin America, 1900-present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Latin America since the beginning of the 20th century. Themes include export economies, oligarchic rule, crises of depression and war, corporatism, populism revolution and reform movements, cultural and ethnic issues, U.S.-Latin American relations, neo-liberal restructuring. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—S. (S.) 

8. History of Indian Civilization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; written reports. Survey of Indian civilization from the rise of cities (ca. 2000 B.C.) to the present, emphasizing themes in religion, social and political organization, and art and literature that reflect cultural interaction and change. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div | AH or SS, WC, WE.

9A. History of East Asian Civilization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Surveys traditional Chinese civilization and its modern transformation. Emphasis is on thought and religion, political and social life, art and literature. Perspectives on contemporary China are provided. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

9B. History of East Asian Civilization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Surveys traditional Japanese civilization and its modern transformation. Emphasis is on thought and religion, political and social life, art and literature. Perspectives on contemporary Japan are provided. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

10A. World History to 1350 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Historical examination of the changing relationship of human societies to one another and to their natural settings through the year 1350, with particular attention to long-term trends and to periodic crises that reshaped the links of culture and nature on a global scale. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

10B. World History, c. 1350-1850 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Major topics in world history from the 14th century to the beginning of the 19th century. Topics will vary but may include oceans as systems of human communication and conflict; the global consequences of "industrious revolutions" in Europe and Asia, etc. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

10C. World History III (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Major topics from world history of the 19th and 20th centuries, emphasizing the rise and fall of Western colonial empires; Cold War and the superpowers; the spread of the nation-states; and process of globalization. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

11. History of the Jewish People in the Modern World (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Histories and cultures of the Jews since 1492. Topics include: the making of Jewish diasporas, roots of antisemitism, the Holocaust in images and texts, changing ideas of the self, Jews in America, contemporary visions of the Jewish past. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum | AH, DD, VL, WC, WE.

12. Food and History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Survey of the ways humans have fed themselves from the dawn of humanity to the present. Transformation of plants and animals into food, cooking into cuisine, and ceremony into etiquette. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, OL, VL, WC, WE.—McKee, Resendez

15. Introduction to African History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Examination of the long-range historical context as background to current conditions in Africa. Includes the early development of African civilizations, the slave trade and its abolition, 20th century colonization, and African independent states. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

17A. History of the United States (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. The experience of the American people from the Colonial Era to the Civil War. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

17B. History of the United States (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. The experience of the American people from the Civil War to the end of the Cold War. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 17C. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

72A. Women and Gender in America, to 1865 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. History of women and gender in America through 1865, emphasizing intersections of gender, race, class, and sexuality. Topics include interracial marriage, slavery, witchcraft, meanings of motherhood, war, domestic labor, moral reform, women's rights, migrations, the effects of commercialization and industrialization. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

72B. Women and Gender in America, 1865-Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. History of women and gender in America since 1865, emphasizing intersections of gender, race, class, and sexuality. Covers emancipation, migration, immigration, war, media, same-sex and opposite-sex relationships, and the birth control, suffrage, labor, civil rights, feminist, and anti-feminist movements. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

80. The History of the United States in the Middle East (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. History of the United States in the Middle East from 1900 to the present. Examination of U.S. foreign relations toward the Middle East, their regional ramifications and domestic repercussions. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, WC, WE.

85. Nature, Man, and the Machine in America (4)

Seminar—4 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. History of the attitudes and behavior of Americans toward their natural environment and their technology, from colonial times to the present. No final examination. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WE.

98. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Primarily for lower division students. (P/NP grading only.) Offered irregularly.

99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.) Offered irregularly.

Upper Division

101. Introduction to Historical Thought and Writing (5)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; term paper. Study of the history of historical thought and writing, analysis of critical and speculative philosophies of history and evaluation of modes of organization, interpretation, and style in historical writing. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: WE.

102A. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; Ancient (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Ancient. May be repeated for credit.

102B. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; Medieval (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Medieval. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102D. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; Modern Europe to 1815 (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Modern Europe to 1815. May be repeated for credit.

102E. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; Europe Since 1815 (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Europe since 1815. May be repeated for credit.

102F. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; Russia (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Russia. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102G. Undergraduate Proseminar in History (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. China to 1800. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102H. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; China Since 1800 (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. China since 1800. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102I. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; Britain (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Britain. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102J. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; Latin America Since 1810 (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Latin America since 1810. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102K. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; American History to 1787 (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. American History to 1787. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102L. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; United States, 1787-1896 (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. United States, 1787-1896. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102M. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; United States Since 1896 (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. United States since 1896. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102N. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; Japan (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Japan. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102O. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; Africa (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Africa. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102P. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; Christianity and Culture in Europe, 50-1850 (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Christianity and Culture in Europe, 50-1850. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102Q. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; India (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. India. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102R. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; Muslim Societies (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Muslim Societies. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.

102S. Undergraduate Proseminar in History; Education Abroad Program (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Education Abroad Program. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WE.

102X. Undergraduate Proseminar in History (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Comparative History, selected topics in cultural, political, economic, and social history that deal comparatively with more than one geographic field. May be repeated for credit.

103. Topics in Historical Research (4)

Discussion—3 hours; individual consultation with instructor; term paper. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research resulting in a research paper on a specific topic in one of various fields of history. May be repeated for credit. Offered irregularly. GE credit: WE.

104A. Introduction to Historical Research and Interpretation (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: acceptance into History Department Honors Program. Directed reading and research aimed at preparing students to select appropriate topics and methodologies for a senior honors essay and to situate their topics within a meaningful, broad context of historical interpretations. Culminates in the submission of a full prospectus for an honors essay. GE credit: WE.—F. (F.) Anooshahr

104B. Honors Thesis (4)

Tutorial—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 104A. Research in preparation of a senior honors thesis under the direction of a faculty adviser. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.) GE credit: WE.—W.

104C. Honors Thesis (4)

Tutorial—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 104A and 104B. Completion of a senior honors thesis under the direction of a faculty adviser. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.) GE credit: WE.—S.

105. Teaching History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Teaching of American and world history at the K-12 level. Emphasis on introducing college students to the multiple ways in which history is taught, and on understanding how history education is determined. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.

108. Global Environmental History (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; project. Global, comparative study of how environmental change, human perceptions of nature, and manipulations of nature have changed over time. Primary focus post-1500, emphasis on critically analyzing many common ideas of environmental change. Not open for credit to students who have taken History 109A. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS.

109A. Global Environmental History (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; project. Global, comparative study of how environmental change, human perceptions of nature, and manipulations of nature have changed over time. Primary focus post-1500, emphasis on critically analyzing many common ideas of environmental change. GE credit: ArtHum, or SocSci | AH or SS.

109B. Environmental Change, Disease and Public Health (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Analysis of environmental changes from pre-history to the present and their influence on disease distribution, virulence and public health; many of these changes have been driven by human action and transformations of pathogens have accelerated under globalization. GE credit: SciEng or SocSci, Div | SE or SS, SL.

110. Themes in World History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing. Issues and topics in world history. Topics will emphasize the interaction of diverse regions of the world as well as common patterns of historical change. May be repeated for credit if topic and/or instructor differs. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

110A. Colonialism and the Making of the Modern World (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. History of the modern world, focusing on struggles between Europeans and colonized peoples; the global formation of capitalism; the creation of nation-states; and the constitution of bourgeois bodies and racial selves in modern societies. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE.

111A. Ancient History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion or paper (student option). History of ancient empires of the Near East and of their historical legacy to the Western world. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

111B. Ancient History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion or paper (student option). Political, cultural and intellectual study of the Greek world from Minoan-Mycenaean period to end of Hellenistic Age. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

111C. Ancient History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion or paper (student option). Development of Rome from earliest times. Rise and fall of the Roman Republic; the Empire to 476 A.D. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

112A. Topics in Pre-Modern Jewish History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Topics in the history of Jews from the Biblical era to the eras of Jewish emancipation. Topics can be framed chronologically (e.g., medieval Jewry) or thematically (e.g., trade and Jewish communities). May be repeated one time for credit. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

112B. Topics in Modern Jewish History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Topics in the history of Jews from the era of Jewish emancipation to the present. Topics can be framed chronologically or thematically (e.g. Zionism, assimilation, the post Holocaust Diaspora). May be repeated one time for credit. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

112C. History of Jews in the Muslim World (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. History of Jewish communities in the lands of Islam from the time of the Prophet Muhammad to the present day. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WC, WE. 

113. History of Modern Israel (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Topics include the rise and fall of utopian Zionism, the century-long struggle between Jews and Arabs, the development of modern Hebrew culture, the conflict between religious and secular Jews, and the nature of Israel's multicultural society. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

115A. History of West Africa (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 15 recommended. Introductory survey of the history of West Africa and/or the Congo region from the earliest times to the present. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

115B. History of East and Central Africa (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 15 recommended. Introductory survey of the history of east and central Africa from earliest times to the present. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

115C. History of Southern Africa (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 15 recommended. Introductory survey of the history of Southern Africa (including South Africa) from earliest times to the present. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

115D. History and Legacy of Colonialism in Africa (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 115A, 115B or 115C recommended. History of the implementation, development, and legacy of European Colonialism in Africa. A comparison of British, Belgian, French, and Portuguese colonial efforts and impacts. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

115E. The African Slave Trade (4)

Lecture—3 hours; writing—1 hour. History of the African Slave trades, from the early Egyptian and Saharan trades in the pre-modern period to the trans-Atlantic trade (15th-19th century) and the contemporary trafficking of humans. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

115F. History of Modern North Africa, 1800 to the Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. History of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya (the Maghrib), 1800 to the present. Topics include conquest and pacification, reform movements, the rise of nationalism, decolonization, state capitalism, economic liberalization, Islamism, democratization and human rights, the interplay of history and memory. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

116. African History: Special Themes (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 15 recommended. Themes of African history, such as African states and empires, slave trade, relationship of Egypt to rest of Africa, Bantu origins and migrations, and French policy of Assimilation and Association. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

119. World War I (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. The First World War and the settlement that followed from 1914-1919. Causes, conduct, and consequences of the war including military, political, economic, social, and cultural factors, with special emphasis on connections between the home front and the battlefield. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SS, WC, WE.

120. World War II (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. The Second World War from 1931 to 1945 in all of its theaters. Causes, conduct, and consequences of the war including military, political, economic, social, and cultural factors, with special emphasis on battlefield strategy and mobilization of the home front. Offered irregularly. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WC, WE.

121A. Medieval History (4)

Lecture/discussion and panel presentations—3 hours. European history from "the fall of the Roman Empire" to the eighth century. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

121B. Medieval History (4)

Lecture/discussion and panel presentations—3 hours. European history from Charlemagne to the twelfth century. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE

121C. Medieval History (4)

Lecture/discussion and panel presentations—3 hours. European history from the Crusades to the Renaissance. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

122. Selected Themes in Medieval History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Each offering will focus on single major theme, such as medieval agrarian history, feudalism, the family, medieval Italy, or the Crusades. Readings include original sources in English translation and modern works. May be repeated for credit. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

125. Topics in Early Modern European History (4)

Laboratory/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Social and cultural history, 1300-1800. Topics such as medieval and Renaissance Italy, early modern Italy, Ancient Regime France, family and sexuality, and material culture and daily life. May be repeated for credit. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

130A. Christianity and Culture in Europe: 50-1450 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written report or research paper. A history of the ideas and institutions of Christianity and their impact on the late Roman Empire and medieval Europe in terms of outlook on life, art, politics and economics. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

130B. Christianity and Culture in Europe: 1450-1600 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written report or research paper. A history of the Lutheran, Zwinglian-Calvinist, Radical, Anglican, and Catholic Reformations as foundation stones of a new culture in Europe, with special attention to the interconnections between the revival of antiquity and the different reform movements. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

130C. Christianity and Culture in Europe: 1600-1850 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written report or research paper. A survey of the intellectual, cultural and political reorientation of European society in the aftermath of the Wars of Religion. "Secularization" will be discussed in the context of the Enlightenment and Romanticism. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

131A. Early Modern European History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. Western European history from about 1350 to about 1500. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Stuart

131B. European History During the Renaissance and Reformation (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Survey of European society, politics, and culture from the late 15th through the early 17th centuries, with particular focus on the Italian and Northern Renaissance, on the Protestant Reformation, and the Catholic Counter Reformation. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Harris

131C. The Old Regime: Absolution, Enlightenment and Revolution in Europe (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Survey of European society, politics, and culture in the 17th and 18th centuries, focusing on religious warfare, absolutism, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment and the growth of religious tolerance, the French Revolution and the collapse of the old regime. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

132. Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Deviance and crime in early modern Europe, contrasting imaginary crimes, e.g. witchcraft, with "real" crimes such as highway robbery and infanticide. Examines impact of gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and class in processes of criminalization. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

133. The Age of Ideas (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. The Enlightenment and its background in the seventeenth century. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

134A. The Age of Revolution (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. Ideas and institutions during the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WE.

135A. History of Science to the 18th Century (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Survey of the historical development of science, technology, and medicine from the ancient world to the eighteenth century, with special emphasis on Isaac Newton as the culmination of the seventeenth century scientific revolution. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Stolzenberg

135B. History of Science, 18th to 20th Centuries (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Survey of the historical development of scientific thought in geology, biology, chemistry, physics, and cosmology from the eighteenth to the twentieth century, with special emphasis on emergence of broad explanatory principles that serve more than one science. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

136. Scientific Revolution (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. History of science in Western Europe (1400-1750). Investigates the changing definitions of science in the age of Copernicus, Versalius, Harvey, Galileo and Newton. Considers the evolution of new ideas about nature, experiment, observation, and scientific theory. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

138A. The Rise of the Russian Empire, 1304-1825 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Expansion of the Russian state in Muscovite and imperial era. Emphasis on autocratic rule, the incorporation of non-Russian peoples, and emergence of Russia as a Great Power. Only two units of credit will be allowed to students who have completed former course 137B. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Campbell

138B. Reform and Revolution in Tsarist Russia, 1825-1917 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Processes of state reform and social change in the 19th century; failure of reform and collapse of the Russian Empire; the revolutions of 1917. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

138C. Russian History: The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union, 1917 to the Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. The emergence of the Soviet Union as a socialist system and a Great Power; the decline and collapse of the Soviet Union and the formation of independent nation states in its place. Not open for credit to students who have completed former course 137C. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

139A. Medieval and Renaissance Medicine (4)

Laboratory/discussion—3 hours; term paper. The history of medicine, circa 1000-1700. Revival of ancient medicine; role of the universities; development of anatomy, chemistry and natural history; ideas about the body; cultural understanding of disease; hospital and the public health system. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

139B. Medicine, Society, and Culture in Modern Europe (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; term paper. History of European medicine, 18th to 20th centuries, by examining the development of medical knowledge in epidemiology and anatomy; function of this knowledge, how it changed with technological breakthroughs and professionalization; and role of medicine in attitudes toward poverty, women, race, disease. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

140. The Rise of Capitalism in Europe (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Comparative analysis of major interpretations of the rise of merchant capitalism during the Middle Ages and Renaissance; European expansion overseas, 1450-1815; the transition to modern capitalism via industrial revolution. Interplay of social, political, cultural, and economic history. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

141. France Since 1815 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

142A. History of the Holocaust (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Topics include comparative genocide, medieval and modern antisemitism, modern German history, the rise of Nazism, Jewish life in Europe before the Nazi period, and the fate of the Jewish communities and other persecuted groups in Europe from 1933-1945. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

142B. The Memory of the Holocaust (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Examination of the literary, philosophical, theological and artistic responses to the Holocaust of the European Jews. Exploration of how memory is constructed, by whom and for what purposes. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

143. History of Eastern Europe and the Balkans (4)

Lecture—3 hours; essays. History of the Baltic, Danubian, and Balkan lands since the Middle Ages. National cultures and conflicts in the Polish Commonwealth and the Habsburg and Ottoman Empires; nationalist movements, 1789-1914; the twentieth century, including an analysis of the contemporary scene. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

144A. History of Germany, 1450 to 1789 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Survey of early modern Germany, 1450 to 1789, covering the theology and social history of the Reformation, the Peasants War of 1525, religious warfare, state building and absolutism, the rise of Prussia, Austro-Prussian dualism, and the German Enlightenment. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

144B. History of Germany since 1789 (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. History of the German lands in the age of the French Revolution; 19th-century liberalism, nationalism, and industrialization; the World Wars, National Socialism, and the Holocaust; east and west Germany in the Cold War; the post-reunification scene. (Not open for credit to students who have completed former course 144.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

145. War and Revolution in Europe, 1789-1918 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Survey of revolutionary movements, international crises, and wars in Europe from the French Revolution to World War I. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

146A. Europe in the Twentieth Century (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Survey of the history of Europe from 1919 to 1939. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

146B. Europe in the Twentieth Century (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Survey of the history of Europe since 1939. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

147A. European Intellectual History, 1800-1870 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. European thought in the early industrial era. Shifting cultural frameworks, from romanticism to scientism; liberal and socialist reactions to social change. Focus on the work of Goethe, Hegel, J.S. Mill, Marx, Darwin and Flaubert. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

147B. European Intellectual History, 1870-1920 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Cultural and intellectual watershed of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Emergence of modern art and literature; psychoanalysis and the new social sciences. Focus on the work of Baudelaire, Wagner, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber and Kafka. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

147C. European Intellectual History, 1920-1970 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. European thought and culture since World War I. Coverage includes: literature and politics; Communism and Western Marxism; Fascism; Existentialism; Structuralism; Feminism. Particular attention to Lenin, Brecht, Hitler, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Marcuse, Foucault, Woolf and de Beauvoir. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

148A. Women and Society in Europe: 1500-1789 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Roles and perceptions of women from the Renaissance to the French Revolution. Emphasis on social and economic factors as well as on discussions of women in the writings of political theorists and social commentators. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

148B. Women and Society in Europe: 1789-1920 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Roles and perceptions of women from the French Revolution to World War I, primarily in France and England. Emphasis on social and economic developments within a loosely chronological and comparative framework. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

148C. Women and Society in Europe: 1914-Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. The history of 20th-century Europe from the perspective of women and the family, and of sexual and gender relations. Emphasis on the impact on women of major events and movements, such as World War I, fascism, Soviet communism, World War II, the welfare state, feminism, and mass culture. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

149. Comparative Cultural History of Modern Britain and France, 1880-1914 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Cultural comparison of the histories of Britain and France during the fin de siecle. Addresses cultural debates of the period (including gender, race, class) and the practices of cultural history. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

151A. England: The Middle Ages (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Origins of England to the accession of the Lancastrians. Survey includes: impact of Norman Conquest on Anglo-Saxon institutions; rise of the Church, common law, parliament, and the economy; thought, arts, and literature to the age of Chaucer and Wyclif. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

151B. England: The Early Modern Centuries (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. From Lancaster and York to the Glorious Revolution. Includes growth of the Church of England; beginnings of modern worldwide economy; rise of the gentry and parliament; thought, arts, and literature in the times of More, Shakespeare, Hobbes, Wren, and Newton. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

151C. Eighteenth-Century England (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. English history from the Glorious Revolution to the French Revolution. Examination of the transformation of one of Europe's most politically unstable kingdoms into the firmly established constitutional monarchy which provided an environment fit to engender the industrial revolution. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

151D. Industrial England (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. English history from Waterloo to the Battle of Britain; the rise and continuance of the first industrial nation, examining the transformation of landed to class society, oligarchy to democracy and bureaucracy, Bentham to Bloomsbury, empire to commonwealth. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

159. Women and Gender in Latin American History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Roles of women and men in the history of Latin America, with an emphasis on the intersection of gender with racial and class categories. Introduction to the theoretical premises of women's and gender history. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

160. Spain and America in the 16th Century (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. The Atlantic world in the 16th century, particularly the transcultural and reciprocal social and economic relations between Spain and America in the course of colonization. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

161. Human Rights in Latin America (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. History of the origins, denial and protection of Human Rights in Latin America. Emphasis on dictatorships, political violence, social resistance, democracy, justice, accountability, truth commissions, memory. Offered in alternate years. (Same course as Human Rights 161.) GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE.

162. History of the Andean Region (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. History of the Andean region, the area that now comprises modern Peru, Bolivia, and Chile, from the beginning of human settlement to the present. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

163A. History of Brazil (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. The history of colonial and imperial Brazil from 1500 to 1889. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

163B. History of Brazil (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. The history of the Brazilian republic from 1889 to the present. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

164. History of Chile (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Emphasis on the history of Chilean political economy from 1930 to the present. Various strategies of development (modernization, Marxism, Neo-Liberalism); the rise of mass politics; the course of foreign relations; and the richness of Chilean literature. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

165. Latin American Social Revolutions (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. Major social upheavals since 1900 in selected Latin American nations; similarities and differences in cause, course, and consequence. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

166A. History of Mexico to 1848 (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. Political, economic, and social development of pre-Columbian, colonial and national Mexico to 1848. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

166B. History of Mexico Since 1848 (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. History of Mexico from 1848 to the present. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

167. Modern Latin American Cultural and Intellectual History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Introduction to the cultural and intellectual history of modern Latin America including architecture, cinema, painting, music, and literature. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

168. History of Inter-American Relations (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. Diplomatic history of Latin America since independence, intra-Latin American relations, relations with the United States, participation in international organizations, and communism in Latin America. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

169A. Mexican-American History (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. Economic, social, religious, cultural and political development of the Spanish-speaking population of the Southwestern United States from about 1800 to 1910. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

169B. Mexican-American History (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. Role of the Mexican and Mexican-American or Chicano in the economy, politics, religion, culture and society of the Southwestern United States since 1910. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE. 

170A. Colonial America (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Colonial society from 1607 to the American Revolution, with emphasis on European expansion, political, social and economic foundations, colonial thought and culture, and imperial rivalry. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE. 

170B. The American Revolution (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Analysis of the Revolutionary epoch with emphasis on the structure of British colonial policy, the rise of revolutionary movements, the War for Independence and its consequences, and the Confederation period. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE. 

170C. The Early National Period, 1789-1815 (4)

Lecture—3 hours. Political and social history of the American republic from the adoption of the Constitution through the War of 1812 and its consequences. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

171A. Jacksonian America (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. The political and social history of the United States from the end of the War of 1812 to the Compromise of 1850. How the market revolution transformed American life, and led the nation towards war. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

171B. Civil War and Reconstruction (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Examination of the political and social history of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the end of Reconstruction in 1876. Causes of the war, the war itself, and the problems of reconstruction after the war. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE. 

171BF. The Civil War in American Film (1)

Discussion—1 hour; film viewing. Prerequisite: course 171B concurrently. Viewing and discussion of films with short writing assignments. (P/NP grading only.) Offered irregularly. GE credit: AH or SS.

171D. Selected Themes in 19th Century American History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Interpretative overview of a single topic in the history of the United States in the 19th century. Sample topics include social history, the 1850s, and southern history. May be repeated one time for credit when topic differs. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.

172. American Environmental History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 17A. Examination of changing relations between people and nature in the area of the current United States from pre-Columbian times to the present. Topics include ecological change; perceptions of nature; social conflicts over "proper" uses of nature; environmental movement. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.

173. Becoming an American: Immigration and American Culture (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. An introduction to the wide range of immigrant experiences and cycles of nativism that have shaped American culture in the twentieth century. From novels, memoirs and films, students will explore how external and internal immigration has created a multicultural society. Offered alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE. 

174A. The Gilded Age and Progressive Era: United States, 1876-1917 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Includes Southern redemption, Western incorporation, electoral corruption, labor movements, Populism, Progressivism, women's suffrage, U.S. imperial expansion, and immigration restriction. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

174AD. Emergence of Modern America: Discussion (1)

Discussion—1 hour; short papers. Prerequisite: course 174A concurrently. Intensive discussion of topics and readings for course 174A. (P/NP grading only.) Offered irregularly.

174B. War, Prosperity, and Depression: United States, 1917-1945 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. America's emergence as a world power, the business culture of the 1920s, the New Deal and World War II. Emphasis on such issues as government regulation of the economy, welfare capitalism, and class, racial, ethnic, and gender conflicts. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

174BD. America in War, Prosperity and Depression: Discussion (1)

Discussion—1 hour; short papers. Prerequisite: course 174B concurrently. Intensive discussion of topics and readings for course 174B. (P/NP grading only.) Offered irregularly.

174C. The United States Since World War II, 1945 to the Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. America's struggle to respond to new complexities in foreign relations, social tensions, family changes and media. Emphasis on such topics as: Cold War; anticommunist crusade; civil rights, feminist and environmentalist movement; New Left; counterculture; Vietnam; Watergate; and the moral majority. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

174CD. The United States Since World War II: Discussion (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 174C concurrently. Intensive discussion of topics and readings for course 174C. (P/NP grading only.) Offered irregularly.

174D. Selected Themes in 20th Century American History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Interpretive overview of a single topic in the history of the United States in the 20th century with attention to the phases and processes of historical change. May be repeated one time for credit when topic differs. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, WE. 

174DD. Selected Themes in 20th Century American History: Discussion (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 174D concurrently. Intensive discussion of topics and readings for course 174D. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.) Offered irregularly.

175. American Intellectual History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Ideas that have shaped politics and society in the United States from colonial times to the present. Topics include American liberalism, republicanism, democracy, constitutionalism, communitarianism, utopianism, pragmatism, feminism, Darwinism, nationalism, conservatism, and economics. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.

176A. Cultural and Social History of the United States (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Study of social and cultural forces in American society in the nineteenth century with emphasis on social structure, work and leisure, socialization and the family, social reform movements and changes in cultural values. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.

176B. Cultural and Social History of the United States (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Study of social and cultural forces in American society in the twentieth century with emphasis on social structure, work and leisure, socialization and the family, social reform movements and changes in cultural values. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

177A. History of Black People and American Race Relations, 1450-1860 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. History of black people in the United States from the African background to Reconstruction. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

177B. History of Black People and American Race Relations, 1860-Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. History of black people and race relations from 1860-present. Emphasis on Civil War, Reconstruction, Segregation, Age of Accommodation, black nationalism, urbanization, civil rights, and changing ideology of race relations. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

178A. Race in America, 1492-1865 (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Racial formation during the Age of Discovery, the Colonial Period, Early National and Antebellum periods up to the Civil War. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 178. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE. 

178B. Race in America, 1865-Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Racial Formation in the Post Civil War. United States from 1860 to the present. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE. 

179. Asian American History, 1850-Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. The historical experience of people of Asian ancestry in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Migration, labor, community formation, race relations, women and gender, popular culture. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

180AN. American Political History, 1789-1896 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Growth of American politics from the birth of the republic to the end of the nineteenth century. Development of political parties, the expanding electorate, and how social issues such as slavery shaped the political process. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 180A. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.

180BN. American Political History, 1896-present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Politics in the United States from 1896 to the present. Topics include race and partisan politics; communism and anti-communism; the New Deal and the centralization of government; and the rise of the imperial presidency. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 180A or 180C. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.

181. Religion in American History to 1890 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. American religious history from colonization through the Gilded Age. Topics include religious diversity in America; native American religion; Protestant evangelism; gender and religion; religion and bigotry; African American religion; religion in the Civil War; and religion's response to modernization. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.—Smolenski

182. Gender and Justice in American History (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Intersection of gender and law in North America from the colonial period through the 20th century. Topics include witchcraft, suffrage, child custody, protective labor laws, regulation of sexuality. Analysis of legal change, trials, and cultural influences. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

183A. The Frontier Experience: Trans-Mississippi West (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. The fur trade, western exploration and transportation, the Oregon Country, the Greater Southwest and the Mexican War, the Mormons, mining discovery, and the West during the Civil War. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.

183B. The Frontier Experience: Trans-Mississippi West (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. Spread of the mining kingdom, the range cattle industry, Indian-military affairs, settlement of the Great Plains and Rocky Mountain Regions and political organization of the West. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE. 

184. History of Sexuality in America (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. History of sexuality in America from pre-European through the late twentieth century. Topics include birth control, marriage, sexual violence, prostitution, inter-racial relationships, heterosexuality and homosexuality, the feminist, gay, and lesbian liberation movements, AIDS, commercialization of sexuality. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

185A. History of Science in America (4)

Lecture—3 hours; research paper. Survey of the European background. Study of American scientific institutions, ideas, personalities, creative processes in science, and of relationships between society and science from colonial times to present. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WE.

185B. History of Technology in America (4)

Lecture—3 hours; research paper. Study of American technology, emphasizing biographical approach to historical understanding of technological change, creative processes, institutions, ideas, and relationships between technology and society from colonial times to present. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WE.

188. America in the 1960s (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing or discussion—1 hour. Tumult and upheaval in American politics, culture, and society 1961-1969. Civil rights; Vietnam, the draft and the anti-war movement; rock and roll and the counterculture; modern feminism; modern conservatism; student movements; urban unrest and insurrection. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci | ACGH, DD, SS, WE.

189. California History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. California history from the pre-colonial period to the present including dispossession of California's Indians, political economy of the Spanish and Mexican periods, Gold Rush effects, industrialization, Hollywood, water politics, World War II, Proposition 13, and the emergence of the Silicon Valley. Not open for credit to students who have completed two courses of course 189A, 189B, 189C. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE. 

190A. Middle Eastern History I: The Rise of Islam, 600-1000 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Middle Eastern history from the rise of Islam to the disintegration of the Abbasid Caliphate; the formative centuries of a civilization. Politics and religion, conquest and conversion, arts and sciences, Christians, Jews and Muslims, gender and sexuality, orthodoxy and heterodoxy. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

190B. Middle Eastern History II: The Age of the Crusades, 1001-1400 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Middle Eastern history during the age of the Crusades and Mongol invasions. The idea of holy war, the Crusades, the Mongols as the bearers of Chinese arts, nomads and sedentary life, feudalism, mysticism, slavery, women in the medieval Middle East. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

190C. Middle Eastern History III: The Ottomans, 1401-1730 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Middle Eastern history from the foundation of the Ottoman Empire on the borderlands of Byzantine Anatolia through its expansion into Europe, Asia, and Africa, creating a new cultural synthesis including the Arab, Greek, Islamic, Mongol, Persian, Slavic, and Turkish traditions. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

190D. Middle Eastern History IV: Safavids Iran, 1300-1720 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Middle Eastern history focusing on Safavid Empire (present-day Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, up to Georgia), beginning with the origins of the dynasty as a powerful religious family, to the establishment of the Empire, focusing on Social, Religious, Economic, and Political History. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

191A. Classical China (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. History of Chinese civilization from its origins through the establishment of city states and the flowering of classical philosophy, to the rise and fall of the First Empire. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

191B. High Imperial China (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Political disunion and the influx of Buddhism; reunification under the great dynasties of T'ang, Sung, and Ming with analysis of society, culture and thought. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

191C. Late Imperial China (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; two long papers. Prerequisite: course 9A or upper division standing recommended. Patterns and problems of Chinese life traced through the Ming and Ch'ing dynasties (c. 1500–1800), prior to the confrontation with the West in the Opium War. Readings include primary sources and novels portraying elite ethos as well as popular culture. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

191D. Nineteenth Century China: The Empire Confronts the West (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; term paper. Prerequisite: course 9A or upper division standing recommended. The decline and fall of the Chinese Empire, with particular attention to the social and political crises of the 19th century, and the response of government officials, intellectuals, and ordinary people to the increasing pressures of Western imperialism. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

191E. The Chinese Revolution (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; extensive writing. Prerequisite: upper division standing recommended. Analysis of China's cultural and political transformation from Confucian empire into Communist state. Emphasis on emergence and triumph of peasant revolutionary strategy (to 1949), with some attention to its implications for post-revolutionary culture and politics. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—W. 

191F. History of the People's Republic of China (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; extensive writing. Prerequisite: upper division standing recommended. Comprehensive analysis of recent Chinese history, including land reform, the Cultural Revolution, the post-Mao era, and the consequences of the new economic policies of the 1980s. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 190C. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

191G. Special Topics in Chinese History to 1800 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 9A recommended. Topics in the history of China from the beginning of the imperial period through the high Qing dynasty. Topics may be framed chronologically (e.g.,the Ming Dynasty) or thematically (e.g., Trade in early Chinese history). May be repeated one time for credit when topic differs. Offered irregularly. GE credit: AH, WC, WE.

191H. Special Topics in Chinese History after 1800 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 9A recommended. Topics in the history of China since 1800. Topics may be framed chronologically (e.g., The Republican Period (1911-1948)) or thematically (e.g., The Modern Evolution of Chinese Law). May be repeated one time for credit when topic differs. Offered irregularly. GE credit: AH, WC, WE.

191J. Sex and Society in Modern Chinese History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Role of sex, gender, and family relations in the development of Chinese politics, society, and personal life in the modern period, 1900-present. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 190C. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum | AH, WC, WE.

192. Internship in History (1-12)

Prerequisite: enrollment dependent on availability of intern positions, with priority to History majors. Supervised internship and study as historian, archivist, curator, or in another history-related capacity, in an approved organization or institution. (P/NP grading only.) Offered irregularly.

193A. History of the Modern Middle East, 1750-1914 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 6 recommended. Transformation of state and society within the Middle East from 1750 to 1914 under pressure of the changing world economy and European imperialism. Themes include colonialism, Orientalism, Arab intellectual renaissance, Islamic reform, state-formation, role of subaltern groups. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE.

193B. History of the Modern Middle East from 1914 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. The Middle East from the turn of the 20th century to the present. Themes include the legacy of imperialism, cultural renaissance, the World Wars, nationalism, Palestine/Israel, Islamic revival, gender, revolutionary movements, politics of oil and war, cultural modernism, exile and diaspora. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE. 

193C. The Middle East Environment: Historical Change and Current Challenges (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; project. Examines Middle East environment and human use of nature over last 10,000 years. Introduction to desert ecology, environmental history and current environmental problems. Case Studies of Egypt, Maghreb countries, Arabian peninsula/Gulf countries, desertification, water, indigenous knowledge, and national parks. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS.

193D. History of Modern Iran, From 1850 to Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 6 recommended. Modern Iran from the mid 19th century to the present. Themes include the legacy of imperialism, cultural renaissance, the World Wars, nationalism, modernization, Islamic revival, gender, revolutionary movements, politics of oil and war. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE.

194A. Aristocratic and Feudal Japan (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper and/or discussion. Broad survey of the cultural, social, religious, and political aspects of Japanese history from mythological times through the sixteenth century emphasizing comparison of the organizations, values, and beliefs associated with the aristocratic and feudal periods. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

194B. Early Modern Japan (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper and/or discussion. Survey of the cultural, social, economic, and political aspects of Japanese history from the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries emphasizing the development of those patterns of thought and political organization with which Japan met the challenge of the nineteenth-century Western expansionism. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div | AH or SS, WC, WE.

194C. Modern Japan (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper and/or discussion. Survey of the cultural, social, economic, and political aspects of Japanese history in the twentieth century emphasizing labor and social movements, militarism and the Pacific war, and the emergence of Japan as a major economic power. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

194D. Business and Labor in Modern Japan (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Survey of labor and management relations in Japan from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

194E. Education and Technology in Modern Japan (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term papers. Survey of education and technology in Japan from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

195B. History of Modern Korea (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: upper division standing recommended. History of Modern Korea, from Yi dynasty period to 1990s. Covers the political and socioeconomic changes in 19th century, modernization under Japanese colonialism, postwar economic growth and effects of the Cold War. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

196A. Medieval India (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; written reports. Survey of history of India in the millennium preceding arrival of British in the eighteenth century, focusing on interaction of the civilizations of Hinduism and Islam and on the changing nature of the state. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

196B. Modern India (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; written reports. Survey of cultural, social, economic, and political aspects of South Asian history from arrival of the British in the eighteenth century to formation of new independent states—India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan—in the twentieth century. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE. 

197T. Tutoring in History (2)

Discussion—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: enrolled as a History major with senior standing and consent of department chairperson. Tutoring of students in lower division courses. Weekly meeting with instructors in charge of courses. Written reports on methods and materials required. May be repeated one time for credit. No final examination. (P/NP grading only.) Offered irregularly.

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor; upper division standing. (P/NP grading only.) Offered irregularly.

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.) Offered irregularly.

Graduate

201A. Sources and General Literature of History; Ancient (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: consent on instructor. Designed primarily for students preparing for higher degrees in history. Ancient. May be repeated for credit when different subject area is studied.

201B. Sources and General Literature of History; Medieval (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: consent on instructor. Designed primarily for students preparing for higher degrees in history. Medieval. May be repeated for credit when different subject area is studied.

201C. Sources and General Literature of History; Renaissance and Reformation (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: consent on instructor. Designed primarily for students preparing for higher degrees in history. Renaissance and Reformation. May be repeated for credit when different subject area is studied. Offered in alternate years.

201D. Sources and General Literature of History; Early Modern Europe (4)

ECS 120: Theory of Computation, Winter 2018

Drop deadline

All ECS courses, including 120, now have a 10-day drop deadline, which is Monday, January 22. This is different from previous quarters, where the deadline was 20 days, so be careful in case you were thinking about dropping this or another ECS course.

Course staff

Websites

We will use different websites for different purposes. Students are responsible for checking Piazza and Canvas regularly for announcements and homework/quiz postings.

Piazza, Gradescope, and Kodethon are external to UC-Davis, so you will have to set up accounts if you don't already have them.

In Gradescope, once you have an account, log in, click on "Enroll in course" on the bottom-right, and use entry code MKYBWR. Note that Gradescope does not have separate first and last names. Be sure to enter your Full Name, both first and last, in that order. Please also enter your UC-Davis student ID number when you register for Gradescope (even though it says "optional" in Gradescope).

Click here to see instructions for using Kodethon. Once you have an account, search for the course "ECS 120 Winter 2018" and use the password ecs120W18 to enroll.

Constructive feedback about any aspect of the course is always welcome. Please write me an email at doty@ucdavis.edu, or if you prefer to remain anonymous, you can use https://sayat.me/DavidDoty

Please direct issues and bugs regarding Kodethon to Piazza, or if it involves private information, directly to Michael Yen (lvlichael8@gmail.com).

Course objective

To study the fundamental abilities and limits of computation, in a mathematically rigorous way.

A major objective is also philosophical: to treat computer science not merely as a tool for automating computation to aid in other endeavors, but as a fundamental natural science itself. P=NP, or it doesn't. There's a polynomial-time algorithm to factor integers, or there isn't. These are questions about our universe whose answers we don't currently know. The answers, whatever they are, promise to be every bit as profound as Maxwell's equations or the principle of relativity.

Prerequisites

ECS 20 with a minimum grade of C-. It is also strongly recommended that you have completed ECS 60 with a minimum grade of C-, or an equivalent course (data structures). Click here to see why ECS 60 is recommended.

Meeting times

Lecture:

Tues/Thurs 10:30am-11:50am, Wellman 106

Discussion:

Section A01: Tues 6:10pm-7:00pm, Haring 2016

Section A02: Fri 9:00am-9:50am, Hutchinson 115

The discussion is supposed to be interactive; ask questions. If you find yourself thinking something like "I wish the TAs would do X in the discussion"... then raise your hand in the discussion and ask them to do X!

Please attend your registered discussion section. Part of the point of discussion is to be smaller than lecture for easier interaction, but this is disrupted if more students go to one section than the other.

Final exam:

Mon, March 19, 8:00am - 10:00am, Young 198 (note this is different from the lecture room)

Office hours

Textbook

None. We will use my lecture notes. Reading will be assigned from these notes. They are updated throughout the quarter, so always get the latest version on Canvas.

Optional textbook:Introduction to the Theory of Computation, by Michael Sipser. Some of the text from my lecture notes is a bit sparse compared to a traditional textbook. If you prefer a traditional textbook with more in-depth explanation, we use mostly the same topics and terminology discussed in Sipser's book. It is also a good source of problems for practice. However, that textbook is not required.

Lecture schedule

The lecture schedule contains the reading assignments and can be found here, which also lists dates of in-lecture quizzes and exams. It is your responsibility to check the lecture schedule to know the dates of quizzes and exams, and to plan appropriately in advance (for example, leaving home early in case of bad traffic). Make-up exams will not be given, except in the case of a medical emergency or a planned absence for a legitimate excuse such as a job interview that cannot be rescheduled.

Asking questions online

Please use the Piazza discussion board. If the subject is of a personal nature, then please write an email to the instructor or TAs or ask during office hours, but otherwise please use Piazza instead of email, so that all students can benefit from the discussion. Canvas has some sort of email/messaging feature, but I don't check it, so please use Piazza/email to contact me instead.

Guidelines for effective questions: There are more and less effective ways to ask for help. Asking effective questions is a hugely important practical skill to develop. Especially when learning new programming languages, software, or frameworks, often the fastest source of help is an online forum such as StackExchange or reddit, but there is no incentive for anyone to answer other than altruism. You need to make people want to help you by making it easy for them to help. Please read here for guidelines on how to ask questions effectively.

No logistical questions during lecture or exam review sessions: I kindly request that questions about course logistics be asked outside of lecture and exam review sessions, such as on Piazza, in order to ensure that the lecture stays on schedule. This includes questions about what content and types of questions will be on exams, whether partial credit will be given for various types of answers, scheduling of quizzes, etc. In the middle of lecture I'm not likely to recall these things accurately. If I wrote them on Canvas or Piazza, then that is a more reliable source than my memory, and if I didn't write them on Canvas or Piazza yet, it probably means I haven't decided yet and don't want to suddenly commit to a decision on the spot.

It may also mean I don't want to answer the question, period. Many of the questions about exam format and content are answered in the section Exam preparation in this syllabus, and a more detailed answer would give away too much information about the exam. So please don't be offended if I simply refer to that section of the syllabus in response to a question about exam details.

Grading

Reading quizzes: 5%

Midterm exam: 30%

Final exam: 30%

Homeworks/in-lecture quizzes: 35%

(optional extra credit) Piazza participation: 2%

Reading quizzes

Reading quizzes are to be completed online on Canvas on your own time, one for each lecture, starting before the second lecture. Each lecture is named, for example, lecture 3a is Tuesday of week 3, and 4b is Thursday of week 4; each quiz is named for the lecture that it precedes. The topics will be some combination of what was already covered in previous lecture and new material from the reading assignment for the next lecture.

The reading quizzes are open-book, open-note, with no time limit. The intention is not to test what you already know, but to learn and to stay engaged, by thinking about the course material several times per week.

If you don't know the answer to a question, don't guess! It is called a "reading quiz" because you really are intended to simply look up the answers in the lecture notes, with possibly a little bit of thinking about what the definitions mean, or perhaps running one of the simulators (http://web.cs.ucdavis.edu/~doty/automata/). Reading quizzes will be available for at least 24 hours before each lecture, and they are due 30 minutes prior to the start of lecture, after which there is no chance to submit. If you have the quiz open at that time, Canvas will automatically submit whatever answers you have entered so far.

Although straightforward, some quizzes can have many questions and take some time to do, so I strongly recommend doing the quiz before the day of lecture, just in case it takes longer than you anticipated. You get to submit twice, so you can correct answers that you got wrong on the first submission. (On rare occasions there may be three submission attempts, for especially long quizzes, but the default number of submissions will be two.)

The lowest two reading quiz scores will be dropped.

Exams

The midterm exam will cover topics from the first part of the course, and the final exam will cover only the remaining topics. In other words, the final exam is not comprehensive. Please see the section Exam preparation for more details and for advice on how to prepare for the exams. The dates of the midterm and final are listed on the lecture schedule.

Exam grades may be adjusted, but only to increase scores, never to decrease them. If the mean is below 80%, I will adjust the grades to obtain a mean of 80%. Unless there is some statistical anomoly, such an adjustment will simply add a fixed number of points to each exam score; e.g., if the mean is 76%, then 4% will be added to each exam score.

No exam scores will be dropped.

Homework

Homework must be submitted electronically on either Kodethon or Canvas (which depends on the type of problem). There are two types of homework problems: auto-graded and written. Auto-graded problems are submitted as text files to Kodethon and scored immediately.

Solutions to the written problems are submitted (as a PDF file) to Canvas, but their score will not depend on whether your written solutions are correct. Instead, the written homework score will come from a short (10 minute) closed-notes quiz given in lecture after the homework is due. Important: If you have not submitted a homework PDF with solutions to all problems to Canvas, you may receive a 0 for your quiz score. So think of the written homework as practice for the in-lecture quiz, but it is not optional practice... you must submit it, and it must be a serious attempt at all problems, to receive credit for the quiz.

This policy sounds strange, but it has a specific goal: to encourage you to think of the homework as the best way to learn the course material, rather than some bizarre dance done in the hope of getting points. You don't have to worry about what sources you may consult, or how much discussion you are allowed to have with other students. You may discuss all written homework with other students, and you may freely consult any online sources to learn how to do the homework. There is no incentive to copy homework from another person or the internet, or to otherwise write something down that you don't understand, hoping to get points. There's no points to get.

Nonetheless, all homework submissions must be your own work (see Academic Misconduct Policy), and you should be able to explain why you believe your solution is correct if asked to do so. If it becomes clear that you do not understand your submitted homework, we reserve the right to subtract points from your homework score, regardless of its correctness.

There will about five total homeworks assigned (including HW0, which is more a test of prerequisite knowledge, and is purely auto-graded problems).

No homework scores will be dropped.

Homework optional challenge problems

Occasionally I put "optional challenge problems" on homework. They are not extra credit and are worth no points. What you potentially get out of solving such problems is 1) skill, 2) fun, and 3) admiration from me. The last may seem unimportant. However, for each course I teach, I get at least one request for a letter of recommendation for graduate school/internships/fellowships, or a request to do an undergraduate research project. Sometimes these requests come over a year after the course is done. If you think there's a chance you might eventually make such a request, it's best to regard these problems as not optional.

You can earn extra credit for helping other students on Piazza if your answers are endorsed by an instructor unsolicited. If you ask for an endorsement, then no matter the quality of your answer, you will not receive any extra credit.

The precise scheme for translating Piazza participation to extra credit points is not specified and will remain that way for the whole quarter. I'll decide something that seems fair at the time final grades are assigned.

Attempted abuse of the system to get extra credit without actually helping someone is against the Academic Misconduct Policy.

Late start policy

If you were unable to enroll or add yourself to the waitlist in the course at the start of the term, and you can produce evidence that you were not able to enroll or waitlist, attend lecture, or access Canvas, please contact me as soon as you are enrolled or waitlisted in the course, and we can arrange to have you make up homework/quizzes whose deadlines preceded your enrollment/waitlisting.

However, this does not apply in the case that you enrolled but thought that you would drop the course (for instance, hoping to be admitted to another course), nor to the case where you were on the waitlist. Once enrolled or waitlisted, you are responsible for attending lecture, checking Canvas and Piazza, and completing assignments/quizzes/exams, just the same as any other student in the course.

Regrade policy

If there is a mistake in grading a problem on an exam or in-lecture quiz, please use Gradescope's "Request regrade" button on the problem where the mistake was made. You will have no more than one week after the grades are published to make a request.

This is to be used in case the grader made a mistake in grading a specificproblem. In other words, the grader pointed out a flaw in your solution to a problem, but the grader was mistaken because your solution does not actually have that flaw.

Regrade requests will be ignored if they do not conform to the format described above. Examples of inappropriate requests: requesting a regrade of the entire exam (rather than of a specific problem for a specific reason), or requesting that fewer points be deducted without referencing the rubric, which explains the reasons for the point deductions.

When we make mistakes grading, it is random, not malicious. Thus it is possible that we made a mistake that helped your score. You should be very sure if you request a re-grade that your solution really does qualify for more points according to the posted rubric. If you request a regrade, then it has the potential to lower your score if you were accidentally awarded too many points the first time. So don't think "It can't hurt to try." It can hurt.

Please note that re-grades only apply to exams and in-lecture quizzes that are graded on Gradescope. There are no re-grades of Canvas reading quizzes, and there are no re-grades for auto-graded homework problems. Typically you may submit solutions to auto-graded problems several times** before the deadline, so if you don't get full credit on the first submission, it is up to you to figure out why and keep re-submitting until you get full credit. This includes the case where a bug is discovered in the auto-grader but fixed before the day of the deadline; in these cases it is your responsibility to re-submit after the bug is corrected, before the deadline.

**In the past we allowed unlimited submissions. Unfortunately, this had an unintended consequence: based on submission logs, some students would submit repeatedly and frequently without carefully reading the autograder feedback and re-reading the instructions. (One student had 60 submissions over the course of an hour, most of which were identical.) For your own sake, to encourage thoughtful consideration of the instructions and feedback, each problem has a submission limit (for most problems, around 50 attempts). This is so high that you should not reach it under any normal circumstances, but low enough to discourage guessing.

Exam preparation

The midterm and final exam are closed book and closed notes, with the exception of one 3x5 inch handwritten notecard, front and back, for each exam. In-lecture quizzes are completely closed book and closed notes (no notecard).

The midterm exam will cover topics from the first part of the course, and the final exam will cover only the remaining topics. In other words, the final exam is not comprehensive. Unless announced otherwise during the quarter, the midterm will cover Automata Theory, and the final exam will cover Turing machines, Computational Complexity Theory, and Computability Theory.

I will often post exams from previous terms to give a sense of their length and difficulty. However, I suggest that you first study the homework and quizzes done in the current quarter before studying previous exams. The answer to the question "Will we have to do the following type of problem on the exam/quiz?" is, "Potentially yes, provided that we covered it in lecture or homework".

I'm always changing how I teach, trying to learn and improve, and each quarter goes a little differently than the previous, with different topic emphasis and speed. When I am writing an exam, I am trying to make sure that the concepts it covers are the same concepts covered in the homework and quizzes of that quarter. I am not thinking about what questions were used the last time I taught the course. Many will likely be similar, but maybe not all. If a previous quarter covered different topics for an exam, then the exam from that quarter may have questions on topics not covered in the current quarter, and it may lack questions on topics that are covered in the current quarter. So you should rely primarily on homework and quizzes from the current quarter for preparation, not on previous exams.

Of course, after ensuring that you understand the homework and quiz questions, if you simply want more practice with concepts from the course, any exam from any quarter is good for that. But there's no promise that this quarter's exam will be a mere tweak to one from an earlier quarter. I do promise to set it up so that if you truly understand a concept from the homework and quizzes, then exam questions on that concept should be straightforward. In other words, the format of each exam question will either be identical to the format of a homework/quiz question, or if it is a different format, it is a format that should be easier than a homework question on the same concept, so that it is more feasible to finish in the limited exam time.

Think of the difficult homework problems as training by running in the mountains, so that running at sea level (the exam) seems easy by comparison.

In general, it is best to answer an exam or quiz question with the least amount of text that answers the question. It is not a good strategy to simply write lots of text hoping that some of it matches the correct answer. Extra text beyond a fully or partially correct answer can be considered evidence of a lack of understanding of the answer that was written.

If there are multiple answers written, then the maximum credit that will be given is for the answer that gets the fewest points, and possibly 0 points even if every answer on its own would get partial credit. 

LaTeX/submitting written homework

You must submit written homework as a PDF on Canvas.

The best option is to use LaTeX to produce the PDF files for homework submissions. It is the most widespread program for producing mathematical text. For several decades it was the only serious way to do so, although now there are alternatives, such as Patoline, and some "hybrids" like certain Markdown engines that allow embedded LaTeX math, e.g., https://hackmd.io/, https://www.madoko.net/, https://upmath.me/. Dropbox Paper is another recent development that allows embeded LaTeX math.

LaTeX is an important skill for computer scientists to develop. In particular, it is useful to be fluent in LaTeX's mathematical shorthand (e.g., n^2 for n2 or \infty for ∞), since this is a de facto standard for communicating mathematics through text.

If you haven't used LaTeX before, see the ECS 120 page on LaTeX for some guidance on how to get started.

Alternatively, if you prefer to write out by hand, you can convert it to PDF by using a scanning smartphone app, such as Genius Scan. They do image processing to make the document much easier to read than just taking a picture with the camera app. Although this is to be turned in on Canvas, I recommend Gradescope's guide for students for advice on using these options. (Gradescope recommends Scannable for iPhone, but I think Genius Scan takes much more readable pictures.)

Some students use a word processing program. I don't recommend this, since it is very tedious to make decent-looking mathematics, but there's no rule against it.

Late homework policy

This late policy applies only to homework submissions. The online reading quizzes have an absolute due time of 30 minutes prior to the start of lecture. The quiz will be unavailable after that time, with no chance to retake it.

Briefly, the policy is that homework will be accepted up to one day after the deadline, but a late penalty will be applied, which grows larger as the day goes on.

On scored homeworks, this penalty applies to the score for the homework, and on unscored homeworks, it applies to the score for the in-lecture quiz.

There is a function p(h), where h represents the number of hours that the homework is late (the submission time is recorded to the nearest microsecond, so p(h) is defined on fractional hours as well), and p(h) represents the percentage of the original score remaining after the late penalty is applied. So, if the original, un-penalized score on the homework is s, then the penalized score is (p(h)/100). At first, p(h) decreases rather slowly with h, but it decreases more rapidly as time passes until 24 hours after the deadline, when homework is no longer accepted since the score would be 0 no matter what.

Formally, p(h) = 100 · (1 - (h/24)4), capped above and below at 100 and 0, respectively:

For example, here are the penalized scores for various submission times:

  • on time: 100%
  • 10 minutes late: 99.99999977%
  • 1 hour late: 99.99969859%
  • 6 hours late: 99.609375%
  • 12 hours late: 93.75%
  • 18 hours late: 68.359375%
  • 23 hours late: 15.65363378%
  • 24 hours late: 0%

This policy has several purposes:

  1. Some students have every intention of getting homework done on time, but maybe something gets in the way the day it's due, or it just takes longer than anticipated. Hopefully the ticking clock starting at the deadline is an incentive to start the homework early enough to finish it on time. But if you make a mistake with time management and don't quite get it done, it won't cost your grade that much to get it in a few hours late.
  2. It is a drain of mental energy and time (hurting every other aspect of the course) to deal with requests to give a full grade to a late homework because it was "only a little late". Under this late penalty policy, if it is only a little late, there is only a little penalty, so there is little incentive to make such requests.

If you're wondering why it's so important to get homework in on time: Homework is how you learn. I prefer not to put a difficult, problem-solving exercise on an exam unless you have done homework covering that topic. (Although I'll happily put a simple, knowledge-testing exercise on an exam as long as we've covered it in lecture, regardless of whether it's been on a homework.) Imagine taking a programming exam after studying a programming textbook, but without having ever written, compiled, run, and tested programs yourself. It would be a train wreck. This course is no different.

That means there is an order of events with a tight schedule: I assign reading on topic A, you read about topic A and maybe take a reading quiz on it, I lecture on topic A, I assign homework designed to learn topic A, I want you to have at least a week or close to it between covering topic A in lecture and the homework deadline**, you submit that homework, we release homework solutions, I want you to have at least a day to study the solutions, and we finally have an in-lecture quiz on topic A.

So, it's crucial to get homework in on time to avoid disrupting this pipeline.

**To avoid stretching this out too much, and acknowledging that historically, most students start the homework within a few days of the deadline rather than two weeks before the deadline, I'll usually consider any one topic fair game for the homework if it is covered in lecture at least a couple of days prior to the deadline, as long as most of the homework topics are covered close to a week before the deadline.

Disabilities

If you have a documented disability and anticipate needing accommodations in this course, please meet with your instructor as soon as possible, and no later than one week prior to an exam. Request that the Student Disability Center staff send the proper form (https://sdc.ucdavis.edu/forms.html) verifying your disability and specifying the accommodations that you require.

Academic misconduct policy

The UC-Davis Code of Academic Conduct outlines what is considered academic misconduct.

Academic misconduct: Homework

Each assignment is to be the product of your own intellectual effort. We will check for cheating in this course. Anyone caught cheating will receive an automatic F.

The general principle to follow is that whatever sort of help you receive to figure out how to do the homework, after receiving this help, you should be able to reproduce the homework on your own, without requiring anyone else's help. That is, help from a website/tutor/classmate is allowed as long as it is help in learning how to do the homework, but that help should not be required to actually do the homework once you have learned how. If you are unable to reproduce a homework that you submit without the person who helped you, then it is not a product of your own intellect, and it means you are misrepresenting someone else's work as your own.

In general, it is acceptable to discuss how to do the homework with other students, but when it is time to sit down and write your homework, you must be able to produce the entire homework without help from anyone else. And if you do consult outside sources (meaning besides the course staff or the lecture notes) to learn how to do the assignment, you must cite these sources. Anything else is misrepresenting someone else's work as your own.

For example, if you look at a proof on a website and to get ideas for how to do the homework, and you indicate precisely which website it was, you will not be referred to SJA. (Although if you merely copy its text you will receive no credit, and it is a dishonest thing to do, regardless of the fact that giving the citation technically stays barely within the bounds of the policy.) It would be a good idea to cite help from instructors and TAs anyway, in order to train yourself always (including outside of this class and this university) to think about who helped you with some work, so that they may be acknowledged. Similarly, if you discuss homework with another student, state this explicitly in your homework submission.

In all cases, the boundary between "getting ideas" from a website/classmate and "copying" may seem arbitrary, but the foolproof way to make sure you are within the bounds of the policy is follow the advice above: after consulting these sources, but before writing up the homework, put all the sources away and write up the homework without looking at them. If you really learned how to do it on your own, you'll be able to, and if you find yourself tempted to look again while writing the homework, then you didn't really "get ideas"; probably the reason you are tempted to look it up again is to copy. Don't do it.

Special exception for randomized problems: some auto-graded homework problems will be specially marked as "randomized". For these problems only, it is acceptable to show your solutions to other students prior to the deadline. This is because every student is randomly assigned a different problem, so the correct solution for one student would not be the correct solution for another student. However, for problems not specially marked as "randomized", the normal rules apply, and you should not show your solutions to other students prior to the late deadline.

Academic misconduct: Exams

Naturally, cheating on exams will be held to the same standard, and anyone caught cheating will be dealt with just as with cheating on the homework.

Academic (and legal) misconduct: Course materials

The slides, lecture notes, homeworks, and other documents I share are not to be redistributed without my permission. This means in particular that you may not post them to sites such as CourseHero. These are copyrighted, either by me or by the textbook author, and you could actually get in legal trouble by sharing course materials improperly.

Academic misconduct: Piazza

As explained in Grading policy, students can receive extra credit for helping other students on Piazza. Piazza unfortunately allows students to modify one another's answers, potentially making it difficult to clearly assign credit to an answer. It is against the Academic Misconduct policy to attempt to obtain undeserved extra credit.

Academic misconduct: Following course policies

The following sentence appears in the UC-Davis Code of Academic Conduct: "misconduct includes... Pressuring an instructor or teaching assistant to regrade work, change a final grade, or obtain an exception such as changing the date of an exam, extending a deadline, or granting an incomplete grade." The policies in this syllabus have been developed and tested over many years and have proven to be reasonable and appropriate for hundreds of past students, so there is little reason to change them now or to grant exceptions. If you request an exception or a change to a course policy that is clearly stated in this syllabus, unless there is a truly exceptional reason to grant it (such as a medical emergency or another professional commitment that cannot be changed), the request will likely be politely ignored. Repeated requests, however, will be considered "pressure" as in the UC-Davis Code of Academic Conduct.

The syllabus page shows a table-oriented view of the course schedule, and the basics of course grading. You can add any other comments, notes, or thoughts you have about the course structure, course policies or anything else.

To add some comments, click the "Edit" link at the top.

Course Summary:

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