1 Gujas

Yome Azadi Essay Contest

A Smart, Catholic Take on Faith and Culture

America Media is the leading provider of news and analysis for thinking Catholics and those who want to know what Catholics are thinking. We are known across the Catholic world for our unique brand of excellent, relevant and accessible coverage. From theology and spirituality to politics, international relations, arts and letters, and the economy and social justice, our coverage spans the globe. America, our flagship print magazine has been published continuously since 1909. America Media is sponsored by the Jesuit Conference of the United States and Canada.

What is America looking for?

  • Pitches for feature-length reported pieces, essays and analysis. Feature-length pieces should be approved as a pitch and discussed with editors before a full manuscript is prepared and submitted.

  • “Faith in Focus” essays starting from personal faith experience

  • "Faith & Reason" essays, more scholarly treatments of theological or philosophical topics. 

  • “Short Take” opinion essays

  • Short poems of thirty or fewer lines

Scroll to the category links below for more details.

Guidelines for All Submissions

America Media accepts select unsolicited, unpublished content for dissemination in print, web and/or other digital formats. All submissions must be made through this web site. America Media does not accept submissions by U.S.P.S. or email, nor do we consider content submitted simultaneously to other publications or media. America Media is solely responsible for the manner, platform (digital, print, etc.) and timing of publication/production.

Content Areas: America Media's location at the intersection of the church and the world informs our content decisions. We seek to examine ideas and events at the crossroads, where insight from religious belief casts new light on an issue of the day, or where events in the world make the challenges of the Gospel more evident.

Our coverage includes:

  • Ideas and events within the secular world but of universal interest to the Catholic conscience or imagination. (i.e. war and peace; economic and social justice issues; migration and immigration; social ethics; artistic/cultural phenomena).    

  • Ideas and events at the intersection of the church and the world. (i.e. the church's role in a conflict; an episcopal pronouncement on public policy; a Catholic response to a political or social problem or movement; a historical, cultural or artistic event that speaks to the relationship between faith and politics/culture).

  • Ideas and events within the church but of universal interest to Catholics. (i.e. theology and spirituality; marriage and family life; church governance; liturgical change; Catholic education; vocations; magisterial teaching; catechesis; religious life and formation).

Audience: Most but not all of our audience is Catholic. More than two-thirds of them are laypeople, not clergy. Almost all of them have a college degree, and two-thirds have graduate degrees. Most of our audience members, however, are not specialists.

Content Standards: Successful submissions demonstrate rigor, order and discipline of thought, as well as honesty and sympathy. The style, prose and analysis should also demonstrate originality, intelligence and imagination. Even when the opposing viewpoint is not explicitly accounted for in the text, contributors should sincerely consider it. Polemics, ideologically-driven arguments, partisan political considerations and facile logic must be avoided. Above all, the submission should say something new.

Original Content/Conflicts of Interest: All submissions to America Media must be the original, unpublished/unproduced work of the author/artist. An author/artist must also disclose any possible conflict of interest—for example, if he or she has received compensation from a third party for writing an article, or if the author is acting as an agent (lawyer, press agent, public relations agent, consultant, etc.) for any person or institution mentioned in the article.

Length of Submissions: Length of submissions varies depending on the platform and department. See individual departments below for specific guidelines.

Style: America Media uses The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage and the Catholic News Service Stylebook on Religion. We do not use footnotes or parenthetical citations.

Payment:Competitive rates, paid on acceptance.

National Post-Secondary Russian Essay Contest (NPSREC)

This contest, established in 1999 by ACTR, has become a signature Russian language contest for post-secondary students around the country. ​Students taking Russian in accredited colleges and universities are invited to participate in the annual National Post-Secondary Russian Essay Contest sponsored by the American Council of Teachers of Russian (ACTR). 
Important Dates and Information
  • Deadline for registration is January 29, 2018.
  • Registration fee is $5.00 per student.
  • Codes and essay topic will be emailed by January 31.
  • Essay contest may take place any time, starting from February 1 through 15
  • Judges' results are expected April 1.
  • Certificates will be mailed out by April 15.
  • Instructors must register students through this webpage (see the Registration section).
  • Submissions must be uploaded to Dropbox. Email attachments will not be accepted.
  • No late registrations or submissions will be accepted.
  • At least one instructor per participating institution must be a current ACTR member, with paid dues.
Instructors must register their students through the link below. The deadline for registering students for the 2018 National Post-Secondary Russian Essay Contest is January 29th. Instructors at an institution with at least one current ACTR member, with paid dues, are qualified to register students. There is a non-refundable $5.00 registration fee for each participating student. No late registrations will be accepted.
​Participating instructors will receive student codes, directions, and the essay topic on January 31. Students should not receive the essay topic until the scheduled time of the contest. All contest participants within the same institution and Russian language course must write their essays in an hour on any day between February 1 and 15, as determined by the participating instructor. Essays must be written legibly on lined paper, the template for which will be emailed along with the directions for administering the contest on January 31. Students are not allowed to consult any books, notes, or outside sources to write their essays, and may not work together. Instructors may not substitute students for those registered. No refunds are available for students who do not show up for the essay contest.
All essays must be submitted as specified here:
  1. Group the essays by Category AND Level, e.g., A1, B3, C2, etc.
  2. Scan the essays in the same group, such as A1, as ONE single PDF file, and save it with a file name exactly like this: A1 Essays_[YOUR INSTITUTION], e.g. A1 Essays_Moscow State University. This file should contain only the A1 essays and no other essays from any other category or level. Do this for each Category-Level of essays that you have.

  3. Sort the "Student Declarations and Waiver" forms into two groups: 1) Students who AGREED to allow their essays to be used for research, organized within by Category-Level and 2) Students who DECLINED, organized within by Category-Level. 

    Scan and save all of the "Student Declarations and Waiver" forms from GROUP 1 as one PDF file with a file name exactly like this: Student Waiver Agreed_[NAME OF YOUR INSTITUTION], e.g.  Student Waiver Agreed_Moscow State University.

    Scan and save all of the "Student Declarations and Waiver" forms from GROUP 2 as a separate PDF file with a file name exactly like this: Student Waiver Declined_[NAME OF YOUR INSTITUTION], e.g. Student Waiver Declined_Moscow State University.

  4. Upload all of the PDF files to a Dropbox folder designated by the contest organizers by no later than February 19.

Only submissions uploaded to Dropbox will be accepted. Failure to use the correct file naming convention or incorrectly filing an essay will result in automatic disqualification of the misfiled essay. 
All essays will be evaluated anonymously; no essay will be identifiable by the name or institution of the student who wrote it. Three judges in Moscow will evaluate essays according to content (the ability to express ideas in Russian and communicate information about the topic) and length, lexicon, syntax, structure (grammatical and orthographic accuracy), and originality or creativity. The judges' results are expected by the beginning of April, and winners will be announced around mid-April in the ACTR Newsletter and on ACTR website. Gold, silver, bronze, and honorable mention certificates will be awarded for the best essays at each Category and Level.
Instructors must place their contest participants into the appropriate CATEGORY and LEVEL
OVERVIEW OF CATEGORIES AND LEVELS
There are three CATEGORIES:
  • Category A: Students with no exposure to any Slavic languages at home;
  • Category B: Heritage speakers of a Slavic language other than Russian AND/OR native speakers of languages of the former Soviet Union with some prior experience with Russian; and
  • Category C: Russian heritage speakers.

The LEVELS for Categories A and B are based on the number of contact hours of formal Russian language instruction at the time of the essay contest, including high school. See below for the criteria.

The LEVELS for Category C are based on the degree of exposure to Russian and contact hours of formal Russian language instruction in college only. ​See below for the criteria.

For study abroad or other immersion programs:
Calculate the number of contact hours of formal language instruction, multiply that number by 2, and use the result as the total number of contact hours.
Category A: Students who do not and did not ever speak Russian or any other Slavic language at home.
Category B:Heritage speakers of a Slavic language other than Russian AND/OR native speakers of languages of the former Soviet Union who have had some prior experience with Russian.
  • Level One (A1, B1): fewer than 100 contact hours of instruction in Russian
  • Level Two (A2, B2): 100-250 contact hours of instruction (2nd-year Russian)
  • Level Three (A3, B3): 250-400 contact hours of instruction (3rd-/4th-year Russian)
  • Level Four (A4, B4): more than 400 contact hours of instruction (4th-/5th-year Russian)​
Category C: Students who were born to Russian speaking families and received most or all of their education in English. These students did not have any formal instruction in Russian before college. 
  • Level One (C1): Students who may or may not speak Russian with their families, and who have NOT attended school in Russia or the former Soviet Union and who had to learn reading and writing skills after emigration. These students have had less than 60 contact hours of Russian instruction in college.
  • Level Two (C2): Students who may or may not speak Russian with their families, and who have NOT attended school in Russia or the former Soviet Union and who had to learn reading and writing skills after emigration. These students have had fewer than 120 contact hours of Russian instruction in college.
  • Level Three (C3): Students who speak Russian with their families, and who attended school for fewer than 5 years in Russia or the former Soviet Union and may have had to relearn reading and writing skills after emigration, and who have had fewer than 60 contact hours of instruction in college.
  • Level Four (C4): Students who speak Russian with their families, and who attended school for 5 or more years in Russia or the former Soviet Union and have not had to relearn reading and writing skills.
Administering the Contest
Submitting the Essays and Student Declarations Forms
Student Categories and Levels
CRITERIA FOR CATEGORIES AND LEVELS
Students other than Russian Heritage Speakers

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