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Term Papers Various Methods Electricity Production

Electric Power Systems Research is an international medium for the publication of original papers concerned with the generation, transmission, distribution and utilization of electrical energy. The journal aims at presenting important results of work in this field, whether in the form of applied research, development of new procedures or components, orginal application of existing knowledge or new designapproaches. The scope of Electric Power Systems Research is broad, encompassing all aspects of electric power systems. The following list of topics is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather to indicate topics that fall within the journal purview.

• Generation techniques ranging from advances in conventional electromechanical methods, through nuclear power generation, to renewable energy generation.
• Transmission, spanning the broad area from UHV (ac and dc) to network operation and protection, line routing and design.
• Substation work: equipment design, protection and control systems.
• Distribution techniques, equipment development, and smart grids.
• The utilization area from energy efficiency to distributed load levelling techniques.
• Systems studies including control techniques, planning, optimization methods, stability, security assessment and insulation coordination.

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Research scientists at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland have demonstrated a new technique for generating electrical energy. The new method can be used in harvesting energy from mechanical vibrations of the environment and converting it into electricity. Energy harvesters are needed, for example, in wireless self-powered sensors and medical implants, where they could ultimately replace batteries. In the future, energy harvesters can open up new opportunities in many application areas such as wearable electronics.

Research scientists at VTT have successfully generated energy by utilizing the charging phenomenon that occurs naturally between two bodies with different work functions. Work function is the amount of energy needed to remove an electron from a solid and it determines, for example, the well-known photoelectric effect. When two conducting bodies with different work functions are connected to each other electrically, they accumulate opposite charges. Moving of these bodies with respect to each other generates energy because of the attractive electrostatic force between the opposite charges. In VTT's experiment the energy generated by this motion was converted into useful electrical power by connecting the bodies to an external circuit. This new energy conversion technique also works with semiconductors.

In many sensor applications and medical implants such as pacemakers, electricity is typically provided by batteries. Research into small energy harvesters that turn mechanical vibration into electricity has focused on piezoelectric and electrostatic devices. Unlike these devices VTT's technique does not require an integrated battery, electrets or piezo materials.

VTT estimates that the new electricity generation technology could be introduced on an industrial scale within three to six years. Energy harvesters and new sensing solutions are among the projected megatrends of the near future. Energy harvesters can replace batteries and other energy sources in applications where maintenance is difficult or impossible.

The findings of the study were published in the Scientific Reports online journal.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Aapo Varpula, Sampo J. Laakso, Tahvo Havia, Jukka Kyynäräinen, Mika Prunnila. Harvesting Vibrational Energy Using Material Work Functions. Scientific Reports, 2014; 4: 6799 DOI: 10.1038/srep06799


Cite This Page:

Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). "New technique for generating electricity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 November 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141110083400.htm>.

Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). (2014, November 10). New technique for generating electricity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 13, 2018 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141110083400.htm

Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). "New technique for generating electricity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141110083400.htm (accessed March 13, 2018).

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